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by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone, tom hudson is on assignment. jeff yastine joins us. the federal reserve kept its key interest rate at zero, but said it's ready to take action to boost the economy when the time is right. that announcement came today as the fed wrapped up its policy meeting in washington. susie, one thing that stood out at this meeting is the fed is getting more worried about inflation. the problem is, inflation is too low, and below what the fed considers acceptable. >> susie: that could be the catalyst for the fed to pump more money into the economy. so what will the central bank do next? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: two more meetings. one two-day event in early november, the other in mid december. that's the window the fed has left this year to boost the economy. but, whether the central bank eases monetary policy in the next few months depends on what happens with the economy. and, fed watcher dana saporta says it's clear now that policymakers have linked their next move to inflation, or more specifically, the lack of it. >> i think the fed is loath to
is probably behind us. the concern about a double dip is over and that now we should take advantage of the favorable seasonals in particular now that the mid term elections will soon be over. >> tom: the blue chips surge nearly 200 points, closing out a fourth straight week to the upside. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 24. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. the bulls are back on wall street. tom, investors were enthusiastic on some encouraging economic news: orders in august for things like machinery and computers were stronger than expected. >> tom: susie, this is the fourth week in a row that the major stock averages were positive and in a big way. let's run down the numbers from today's action. the dow jumped almost 200 points. the nasdaq added 54 and the s&p 500 rose 24. those indexes were up roughly 2% eac
investment strategist sam stovall says investors are less worried about the u.s. slipping into another recession. >> we're getting better than expected economic data which is making investors believe that we are now moving further and further from the deflation and double digit precipice and as a result that pushed share prices out of the 100 point range we've been experienced since april of this year and now i believe from a technical perspective we're going to challenge that april 23rd high. >> susie: while stocks are having a break out september, the housing market remains stalled. fewer new homes were sold than expected in august, confirming that housing has yet to recover. purchases were unchanged, matching july as the second worst month since 1968. as suzanne pratt reports, it could be 2012 before housing market conditions get back to normal. >> reporter: at halstead property in hoboken new jersey, there's only one word to describe business: inconsistent. a stone's throw from manhattan's stronger real estate market hoboken offers buyers everything from modern condos to historic b
what high cholesterol is or how many visits and says, "use good medical management," well, that's an open-ended and very debatable question. >> reporter: also debatable? how disruptive the new law will be. already, insurers including aetna, cigna and humana say they will stop selling plans that cover only children. since they can't limit pre- existing conditions, insurers worry parents will wait until after kids are sick to buy coverage. and this is only the beginning. most of the big changes don't kick in until 2012, including new purchasing pools and the requirement for everyone to have insurance. florida insurance commissioner kevin mccarty expects lots of changes between now and then. >> some companies are going to be deciding whether to stay in the market. we obviously like to see a conservative approach to keep as many people in the marketplace as possible. >> reporter: while there is a lot of uncertainty in the implementation of the health care law, there's also uncertainty about the law itself. florida is one of 20 states suing to block the health care law, and many repu
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)